Morgan Delarue

Morgan Delarue

Morgan was born in Rouen, the mighty capital of Normandy, invaded countless times by the Brittish. During his Physics undergraduate studies at ENS Cachan, he quickly realized that Quantum Physics or Particle Physics would not be his cup of tea, and was introduced to the great field of Biology. He obtained a Master degree from the University Paris VII / XI in Biophysics, and joined the Institut Curie in 2010 for his PhD where he worked with G. Cappello and F. Montel on the understanding of mechanical compression on the physiology of multicellular spheroids.

Morgan wanted a strong control over the mechanical environment and believed that this could be achieved through microfluidics. He joined the team of O. Hallatschek at the University of California, Berkeley, for 3 years, where they developed new types of microfluidic chambers that they termed “mechano-chemostats” for the study of a population of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae under well defined chemical and mechanical conditions.

This is when he met L. Holt who was about to start his own group at New York University, and who was at the time developing an amazing new technology called GEMs, that enabled real-time monitoring of microrheological properties in various organisms by genetically-encoded nanoprobes. Morgan joined his lab in 2016, diving more into the genetics of yeasts, as they were unraveling how the rheological properties of the yeast cytoplasm could be modulated by mechanical, chemical, and even genetic alterations.

Morgan obtained a CNRS Researcher position by the end of 2017. He is now working in the MILE team in the LAAS-CNRS. We specialize in the MILE team in the use of microfluidic to study the living. In particular, Morgan’s research focuses on mechano-biology, using biological systems from yeasts to mammalian cells to study the impact of compressive mechanical stresses on the living, with applications in fundamental biophysics and in cancer science. He is also an invited researcher in the Team 17 of J. Guillermet-Guibert of the Cancer Research Center of Toulouse (CRCT), specialized in signaling in pancreatic cancer. You may find more information about the ongoing projects here.


Current members

Lucie Albert
PhD student

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

MMBM team, IPGG

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Baptiste Alric
PhD student

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

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Zacchari Ben Meriem
Post-doc

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

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Térence Desclaux
PhD student

IMFT

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

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Mickaël Di Luoffo
Post-doc

Team 17, CRCT 

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS (invited)

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Sylvain Goimard
M2 student

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

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Claire Lac
Research assistant

Team 6, CRCT

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

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Laure Le Blanc
PhD student

Pathog. vasc. infec., Inst. Pasteur

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

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Tiphaine Matéo
PhD student

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

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Morgan Delarue
CNRS researcher

MILE team, LAAS-CNRS

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Alumni

G. Lemercier
Post doc

10/2018-06/2019

Engineer @ Cardiorenal

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P. Lefebvre
Post doc

09/2019-08/2020

Assistant prof. @ Univ. Lorraine 

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I. Rizzuti
PhD student

09/2018-12/2019

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X. Zhao
M2 student

03/2019-09/2019

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M. Moré
M2 student

02/2019-07/2019

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J. Bos
M1 student

03/2020-09/2020

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